Carolina Gold

Carolina GoldCharlotte Fraser is all alone in the world. Her mother died when Charlotte was just 12 years old and her father has only recently passed, leaving her to shoulder a load. Against the better judgment of others Charlotte is determined to get the family rice plantation up and running in Reconstruction Era South Carolina. The obstacles are many, the solutions few. To bring in the very much needed cash Charlotte takes up writing while agreeing to educate her widower neighbor’s two daughters, all the while attempting to run a plantation. It doesn’t exactly bring her tears of joy, however, when she learns her neighbor, Nicholas Betancourt, might be the true owner of her property. Charlotte has her job cut out for her  and it isn’t going to be easy to come to terms with what lays ahead.

First off Carolina Gold was a downright decent book. What a novelty! High five, Dorothy Love! The story itself wasn’t action-packed, but then if you’re not like me that may be all right with you. But speaking for myself, I like a healthy dose of adventure in stories. It was refreshing to see former Confederates in Reconstruction Era South having difficulties coping with the Union soldiers and carpetbaggers. Off the top of my head, the last few novels I read set in this period usually showed Southerners very chummy with Northerners (that’s not to say they weren’t; I recall some children’s stories from the 70s and 80s usually followed characters with an anti-North stances, but more recently characters have been given rather progressive/modern viewpoints). As for the writing it was first-rate. I look forward to seeing other books by this author.

DISCLAIMER: In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” we would like to note that we received an electronic copy of “Carolina Gold” from NetGalley.com provided by the publishers, Thomas Nelson, in exchange for our honest review.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Carolina Gold

  1. “To bring in the very much needed cash Charlotte takes up writing.” May we chuckle together on this one? When was the last time decided to be a writer brought in extra cash…or even cash?

    I book I’m reading now has that same adventure/action element to it while still being a well-written, engaging plot. Isn’t life grand when things like that work out?

    • Hah! Yeah, right? Maybe bring in a few pennies. Or if your lucky, a contributor’s copy. Although in my latest escapade I may have to purchase my own contributor’s copy!

      Win-win! Good to hear you managed to find one. I’m amazed at what publishers are accepting nowadays and despair over what has become of juvenile historical fiction. The horror!

What's on Your Mind?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: